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Library: Creative Design

 

Matching perspective? It's no longer a chore with the Vanishing Point filter

Added on Monday 15th of February 2010 04:33 am EST

 



To use the Vanishing Point filter, you define planes on one image that act as perspective guides that suit a variety of perspective techniques. For example, if you paint or clone in the affected area, your pixels are skewed into the proper perspective as defined by the planes you created. This allows you to paste patterns, doors, and windows on the planes to alter the appearance of an architectural structure. Or, you can position text or a logo into perspective, to make it look like the logo was printed on a box, as shown in FIGURE A. We’ll show you how it works by placing a sign on a garage door with accurate perspective.


Find a new perspective
Before you can begin using the Vanishing Point filter, you need two images: one with perspective and the other to contour to the perspective lines. To follow along with our example, download the file VP.ZIP from the URL given at the beginning of this article, and open the file PERSPECTIVE. PSD, as shown in FIGURE B. (Images provided by PhotoSpin. Some images modified for educational purposes.) It contains two images on two layers.

One layer contains an image of a garage door, and the other layer has a sign that we’ll place in the correct perspective on the garage door using the Vanishing Point filter.

To p...