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Library: Inside Photoshop

Browse through Inside Photoshop library to enhance your creativity

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Inside Photoshop, May 2015
 Inside Photoshop, May 2015 Issue

 

Give your designs a lift with light and airy soap bubbles

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:02 am EST
 

by Amy Palermo

Photographing soap bubbles is challenging because you can’t control precisely where your bubbles will float, and you can’t always capture those swirling highlights of color. Also, you might want to add a specific quantity of bubbles to a pre-existing photo. No worries! We’ll show you how you can add custom soap bubbles—like the ones shown in Figure A—to any design, in just a few easy steps.

Figure A:
Article figure image

Shape and form a bubble

You can create bubbles on any photo, but if you want to follow along with our example, download the file bubbles.zip from the URL given at the beginning of this article, and extract the file daisy.tif.

If you examine a soap bubble closely, even though the bubble is clear, you can still see colors swirling around. The colors eventually dissipate, changing to black, right before the bubble meets its final fate—popping! To create a realistic bubble, we’ll start with the bubble’s primary physical characteristics: its spherical shape and swirling color. We’ll use the Elliptical Marquee tool to create a selection, and then use a few filters to define that form and color.

To create a round bubble and colorize it:

  1. Click on the Create A New Layer button at the base of the Layers panel to add a new layer.
  2. Select the Elliptical Marquee tool from the Tools panel.
  3. Press
 

 

Turn the heat up on your text

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:06 am EST
 

by Michelle Dick

With all the filters included in Photoshop, some pretty wild things can be done to text. To expand text options even further, you can play around with both layer styles and filters to create limitless text treatments. The results can be some pretty cool looking (or, in this case, hot) text, as shown in Figure A. We’ll show you how to quickly create this text effect

 

 

Apply gradual transition fades with gradient layer masks

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:08 am EST
 

Applying a layer mask to fade an image is a great way to make the image more accessible for text in your layout, as demonstrated in Figure A.

Figure A:
Article figure image

If you’re unable to apply a layer mask to a layer, the key is that your image can’t be a locked background layer. To follow along with our example, launch Photoshop and open any image that has a locked background layer, as indicated in Figure B.

Figure B:
Article figure image

To apply a gradient layer mask:

  1. Double-click on the Background layer to open the New
 

 

3 easy ways to give your images a timeless hand-tinted look

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:11 am EST
 

by Amy Palermo

Long before the invention of color photography, photographers sought to add color to their photos. They did this by coloring or tinting their black-and-white photos with pastels, oil-tints, and gold paints. But even after the development of modern color photography in the mid 1930s, hand-tinted photos have remained a popular way to exhibit photos. By using Photoshop, you can avoid the fuss of actual hand tinting while achieving the same result. We’ll show you three ways to do this, which will enable flexibility and offer you options to achieve different results, as illustrated in Figure A.

Figure A:
Article figure image

Article figure image

Article figure image

Select a suitable subject

Important to the success of the hand-tined look is applying it to the right subject. Because you apply a tint as generalized color over a black and white or monochromatic background, the content of your photograph should be simple and normal in contrast. People, pets, and landscapes have been the traditional subject matter for hand-tinted photos, and they continue to work well for the technique.

To follow along using our example, download the file hand_tinted.zip from the URL given at the beginning of this article and extract the file first_kiss.psd. (Images provided by PhotoSpin. Some images modified for educational purposes.)

Prepare your image

Since two of the three techniques require us to pull color from the original image, we’ll start with a color image. We’ll set up three files from one image to include a desaturated copy of the image as the foundation for all three techniques.

To prepare the documents:

  1. Launch Photoshop and open First_kiss.psd. Our example is an informal portrait of young love at its finest moment.
  2. Drag the Background layer to the Create A New Layer button at the base of the layers panel to duplicate it; name the new layer Black And White. We’ll use this layer for the black-and-white aspect of our hand-tinted look for all three techniques.
  3. S
 

 

Paint a stylized portrait from your everyday photos

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:14 am EST
 

by Amy Palermo

Let’s face it; we all have blemishes, bad hair days, and facial features we’d rather not capture in a portrait. Not to worry—what the camera doesn’t hide, this technique will. We’ll show you how to create a stylized portrait painting from an ordinary photo, as shown in Figure A. With some simple brush strokes, you can flatter your subject but still maintain the integrity of the original photo.

Prepare your canvas

To get started with this technique you’ll need a portrait image. If you want to follow along with our example, download portrait.zip from the URL given at the beginning of the article and extract the file portrait.psd.

To begin our technique:

  1. Launch Photoshop and open an RGB flattened photo to work with, such as the original shown in Figure A.
  2. Duplicate the Background layer and name the new layer Color.
  3. Select the Background layer and choose Image > Adjustments > Desaturate.
  4. Duplicate the background layer again and name this new layer Grayscale.
  5. Turn off the visibility for both the Background layer and the Color layer. We want to preserve the background layer and won’t need to refer to the Color layer until later.
  6. Create a new layer and name it Shadows.
  7. Create two more new layers and name them Midtones and Highlights respectively.
  8. Rearrange your panel if necessary so that your layer order resembles ours shown in Figure B.

Figure A:
Article figure image

Article figure image

Figure B:
Article figure image

Select some grays

To ensure a well rounded tonal range, we’ll sample about five shades of gray from our Grayscale layer. We’ll add these samples to our panel to have handy while we paint.

To add some grays to your panel:

  1. Choose Window > Swatches.
  2. Choose the Eyedropper Tool from the Tools panel.
  3. Sample
 

 

Intensify the Clouds filter with this trick (CS5/CS6/CC/CC 2014)

Added on Tuesday 12th of May 2015 05:16 am EST
 

by Amy Palermo

While the Photoshop Clouds filter isn’t the best choice for rendering clouds, it’s very useful as a springboard for many different artistic techniques. Simply cho