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Removing moi patterns caused by digital cameras

Added on Thursday 2nd of February 2012 03:03 am EST
 

By Amy Courtright
Application:
Adobe Photoshop CS2/CS3/CS4/CS5
Operating Systems:
Macintosh, Microsoft Windows

I hope you can help me with this problem. This shot was taken at a pretty high resolution. The rings are not real noticeable until you start magnifying the image. I’m not really sure why they are there. I believe it has something to do with this guys cheep polyester suit and this angle to the camera. (The lights were on stands and remained stationary.) Similar shots have less of it and different poses have none. 
Is there any way of taking them out? I am able to select them with select – color range, paste them into their own layer and feather 5 pixels. But no amount of curve correction seems to make them fade into the jacket.
Brian Buckley
Buckley Photo Inc.

When taking pictures with digital cameras, color artifacts or moiré patterns may be visible in your images, as displayed in Figure A. This usually happens when photographing cheap suits. No, actually this is quite common when photographing areas that are detailed such as woven fabrics. When taking digital photos there are certain techniques you can apply to reduce or prevent these annoying moiré patterns to appear. But for occasions such as this, you can use Photoshop to eliminate the moiré all together.


A

Early prevention
First and foremost, if you see a moiré pattern when you’re previewing your photo, try moving the camera back or forward by a couple of inches. Occasionally this will fix the problem or at least lessen it. Also, try decreasing the depth-of-field. The less you have in focus the less apt it is for a moiré pattern to appear. Other than that, try holding your camera at a slight angle. And if these preventative measures fail, you can always fix the ...