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Library: Creative Design

 

Create fine art effects fast with Pathfinder and Gradient commands

Added on Wednesday 4th of February 2009 09:23 am EST

 
Application > Adobe Illustrator CS/CS2
Operating Systems > Macintosh, Microsoft Windows

 

The modern art movement of cubism was started in 1906 by two French artists, Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso. It was so powerful a force on the art world of the time that its infl uence has been felt ever since. To create a cubist painting, a three-dimensional view of a subject is broken up into many surfaces, or cubes, and then reassembled into an abstract arrangement, as shown in the left side of FIGURE A. Often these surfaces intersect in such a manner as to create a space fi lled with every progressing and receding background and subject planes. The eff ect is at once ambiguous as well as captivating, and well worth the eff ort of such an undertaking. But it's also ambitious, and with today's time constraints, diffi cult to achieve. By using Illustrator's Pathfi nder and Gradient commands, you'll discover it isn't as impossible as you might think, as shown in the right side of FIGURE A.



 

Study your subject
Just as important as the technique is to our artwork, the subject is as well. Since a key principle of cubism is the simultaneous rendering of the subject from a variety of viewpoints, the cubists would most often choose a subject that was workable from several vantage points. Subjects that had great appeal from a front view, but were not all that distinguished from a side or top view weren't used all that often. So when choosing a subject:
It's good to study it carefully from all angles.
As you examine it, imagine how diff erent views might look superimposed upon each other.
Determine whether the various views compliment or detract from your subj...